Featured

2018 PAMA International Symposium

36th Annual PAMA International Symposium Glamour and Grit: Building An Entourage for Health Chapman University Orange, California, USA Saturday, June 30 – Tuesday, July 3, 2018 The theme for our 2018 symposium is oriented around combining all the facets that facilitate improved health support in the arts, to ensure that performing artists’ needs are addressed from all angles. These include: Health education in performing arts training (physical and psychological) Access to appropriate health care Training & educating Performing Arts Medicine specialists to meet the needs of this population Addressing the cultural biases that perpetuate unhealthy habits/ practices in the arts Creating safe working environments for performers Target Audience The PAMA symposium is designed to meet the research and practice needs of physicians, therapists, athletic trainers, educators, artistic directors, and other health care and performing arts professionals who seek to improve the well-being of performing artists. Prime Keynote Speakers Special Guest Lectures Abstract Presentations Networking with PAM professionals Click here to view the schedule Click here for more information Click here for fees and registration               

More Info

Pre-conference Certificate Course: Essentials in Performing Arts Medicine

Two-day Pre-conference Certificate Course In conjunction with ACSM June 28 – 29, 2018 Chapman University, Orange, California Specialized training in prevention and management of health issues in performing artists The Essentials of Performing Arts Medicine is a two-day multidisciplinary enrichment course offered by the PAMA Education Committee. Designed to match the professional interests and career goals of health professionals, educators and performers, this course provides specific education and techniques for prevention, assessment, and care of performing arts-specific health concerns. Collectively on day one, participants will hear introductory and research-informed lectures on health problems that are unique to performing artists including associated health risk factors, issues across the life-span, and the interactive, cultural, and contextual characteristics of health problems that are unique to performing artists. On day two, participants will attend either the health professional or the performing arts stream for more detailed and targeted education and practical sessions related to providing and promoting optimal health for performing artists. Target Audience The target audience includes healthcare professionals, performing artists and performing arts educators, and others interested in learning the essential information needed to provide initial assessment, treatment, referrals and general educational recommendations for the performing artist. (Includes: physicians, physician assistants, nurses, athletic trainers, physical and occupational therapists, other healthcare professionals, arts educators, and performing artists.) Certificate Exam At the completion of the pre-conference course, all participants will have the option of taking an exam tailored to their area of specialization (medicine, allied health, voice, dance, instrumental music). If a passing grade is attained, they will be given a certificate of completion. ...

More Info

Designed for Musicians, Health Clinic Saves Lives

By Bethany Bultman, co-founding director and chair of the New Orleans Musician Assistance Foundation, August 28, 2015 August 26, 2005 was a typical lazy end of summer Friday afternoon at the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic (NOMC). At 4 pm our office administrator locked the file cabinets containing the health records of our 837 active patients, turned out the lights, and rode the elevator down seven flights to street level. It would be the last time any of our staff would enter that office. Since the musician’s clinic was founded on May 1, 1998, our mission has been to sustain New Orleans’ musicians in mind, body, and spirit. Our musicians are the backbone of New Orleans’ number one industry: tourism. The NOMC proudly serves a culture which was bent by slavery, poverty, disease, and flood and who responded un-broken with the USA’s only indigenous art form, Jazz. Our health care team serves members of brass bands who overcame the violent deaths of some of their members to be nominated for a Grammy, and yet in 2015 continue to live in such poverty that they must rent their horns. We treat iconic Mardi Gras Indians who still live in homes that lack a roof 10 years after the floods of Katrina. Read Bethany Bultman’s complete article at Next City

More Info

AATA Ambassador – Amy Yakima

Biography Amy Yakima is one of the most popular and accomplished dancers in the United States. She started her training at age 3 at Noretta Dunworth School of Dance in Dearborn, MI. At age 11, she scored the coveted role of “Clara” in the Radio City Christmas Spectacular starring the Rockettesin Detroit, Michigan and New York City. After graduating high school in Northville, Michigan, Amy attended Marymount Manhattan College on scholarship for 1 year in New York City, then toured the country with West Coast Dance Explosion. Amy gained international fame in 2013 when she won the title of “America’s Favorite Dancer” on the hit television show, “So You Think You Can Dance.” She appeared on the cover of “Dance Spirit” magazine, toured with the SYTYCD show across North America, and even danced on the Ukraine version of the show (Everybody Dance!) She has assisted several of the top choreographers in the dance world today, including Travis Wall, Stacey Tookey, Dee Caspary, Joey Dowling, Jaclyn Ford, Sonya Tayeh, Dana Fogila, Chris Jacobsen, Marissa Osato, Matt Tseng, and Ricky Palomino. She has done commercial work with Nike and appeared in the video “Something In The Water” by singer Carrie Underwood. She currently works as faculty for Velocity Dance Convention and performs on tour with Travis Wall’s dance company, Shaping Sound.   AATA Ambassador – Amy Yakima (PDF)

More Info

Smoking ban takes effect in New Orleans bars

By Campbell Robertson New York Times  April 23, 2015 NEW ORLEANS — No one goes to a bar here, particularly one that advertises its hours as “2 p.m. till,” and expects precision about the time of day. But it was right on the stroke of midnight that Frankie Mazzanti, 56, one of the owners of the low-ceilinged neighborhood joint called 45 Tchoup, went along the bar picking up ashtrays and tossing them in a plastic bag. “All right guys, put ’em out,” he said. “Sorry, it’s over.” Just after midnight Tuesday, it became illegal to smoke in bars in New Orleans. Last call for cigarettes went out across the city: at the hazy Bud Rip’s bar in the Bywater; among the cigar-smoking crowd in the leopard print chairs at the French 75 bar in the French Quarter; at the Kingpin, where the bartenders handed out Nicorette gum; and at 45 Tchoup, where smoke had settled in so heavily that it began to form something like an Alpine cloud bank. “This is one of the smokiest bars in town,” said Steve Zweibaum, 57, the owner of a jazz venue nearby who, while smoking a cigarette, spoke of how he had quit smoking long ago. “I know a bunch of people who don’t come in here because of the smoke,” he said, listing names. “Maybe they’ll come back.” New Orleans is late to banning smoking in bars, but it is not the last US holdout. Read full article

More Info

Office Depot Small Business Ad Spotlights NOMC&AF

New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic Keeps the Music Alive The crash of the cymbals. The blare of the trumpet. The beat of the drum. Music in New Orleans has elevated the culture into a signature style deeply rooted in history. But performing live can take its toll, and caring for the musicians has become a mission for the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic (NOMC). Since 1998, the NOMC has provided high-quality healthcare and wellness for over 2,500 players regardless of ability to pay. Watch how this nonprofit stays organized to keep performers “alive in body, mind and spirit” so they can continue their passion for great music. Watch the video  

More Info

Extending the Reach of Healthcare Programs by Overcoming Obstacles to Use in New Orleans

The City of New Orleans | March 18, 2015 What is New Orleans proposing? The city of New Orleans is focused on increasing use of healthcare services by overcoming points of resistance through more effective public engagement. New Orleans seeks to increase the number of people using healthcare services under a Medicaid waiver program. Engaging residents would help New Orleans better understand why people don’t use the program today and how the city could address those issues. The City Accelerator would help the city adapt leading approaches to this work. Go to Video

More Info

Auditory and Oral Health

Click here to browse articles on Auditory and Oral Health

More Info
Page 1 of 2 12